The chattering class is obsessing over the unprecedented stayaway in the European Elections of last Sunday, with dire predictions of an alienated population drawing away from politics and leaving the field of government open to various dark forces. Others shrug their shoulders and comment that just as Greek living standards have risen to approximately the EU average, so Sunday’s turnout of 53.63 percent was close to (but still better than) the EU average of 42.94 percent. The cynics have a point: perhaps it is not such a bad thing when politics are not at the center of everyone’s life, perhaps this shows that Greece is moving away from the highly-charged, politically-divisive years that both preceded and followed the military dictatorship of 1967-74.
This could be a valid argument in another country where politics might actually have something to do with formulating policy and governing, where the news media are intent on presenting problems and demanding solutions. In Greece, though, the art of politics is no longer about proposing solutions. The debate is all about who is “better,” who is “more just,” who “cares more” about the little guy – without presenting any specifics. Journalists play along for a number of reasons: they believe that being in communion with politicians means that they are part of the political process, irrespective of its content; neither the politicians nor the journalists really need to know anything about the difficult subjects with which the government must grapple, so no one is held to account for being inadequate; those who pull strings from behind the scenes are able to indulge in their multi-party conniving without politicians or journalists showing them up – indeed, a significant number of politicians and journalists are in the pocket of big interests.
As we wrote in Athens Plus last week, the chief concerns of all European citizens, and especially Greeks, in the run-up to the European Parliament elections were unemployment, declining growth, the loss of purchasing power and the precarious situation regarding their pensions. Not only did the Greek campaign fail to deal with any of these issues (or, indeed, with European matters in general) but it also ignored pressing issues that had arisen in the meantime, such as the breakdown of law and order in parts of Athens due to state inaction on the issue of illegal immigration. This left the field open for Giorgos Karatzaferis’s extreme rightwing LAOS party to pretend that it had a policy and so come out of these elections with the greatest gains – when all the other established parties lost a significant number of voters.
So why would citizens vote? A poll conducted by Kapa Research found that 74.4 percent of those who stayed away did so because of “the lack of proposals to solve the problems that the country faces.” Among New Democracy voters who stayed away, 59.3 percent said they did so in protest at the country’s politicians as a whole, while for PASOK the corresponding figure was 55.3 percent.
The question that we now face is whether politicians and journalists have conspired to turn citizens away from politics because they are serving the interests of some conspiracy – or simply because they are useless.

Milestones&Footnotes comment in Athens Plus, 12 June, 2009

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